Why you need a content marketing strategist

Submitted by Sam Moore on Fri, 08/25/2017 - 22:13

Hat tip to my colleague Jeff Couret, for the pointer to this informative Moz article on how to identify low-quality content on your site:
https://moz.com/blog/low-quality-pages

I've been in discussions with a startup client about how important it is to have a content strategy, and how much value we could get from a content strategist.
Of course, everyone thinks they're a great writer - just as everyone has a nephew who could build our corporate web site; so why do we need a professional to sort out our content? Can't we just write about our product and trust Google to pick up our articles and blog posts?

If you think that, ask yourself if you understand what bounce rate tells you about the content quality of a page (hint: a high bounce rate isn't necessarily bad). And do you know what pogo-sticking is, and what is says about your content quality?

A content strategist will monitor and improve your offerings to site visitors in a way that gets you SEO credit for your great writing, and satisfies your users. And that makes Google very happy.
 

The Register: Comcast promises not to sell your data.

Submitted by Sam Moore on Sat, 04/01/2017 - 11:27

In other news, your check is in the mail.

 

Comcast says its customers shouldn't worry about having their browsing histories or personal information sold off by Comcast, because the cable giant doesn't have any immediate plans to do so. And if they do decide to change that policy, customers should rely on the state governments to stand up to a company that writes its own laws in many places.

In short, Comcast may be able to sell out its customers now, but customers should trust them not to.

And who can you trust, if not the company that once changed a customer's name to "Asshole Brown" out of spite?



https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/03/31/comcast_we_will_never_sell_your_data/

The Register: Now your dishwasher's web server is vulnerable to attack.

Submitted by Sam Moore on Fri, 03/31/2017 - 15:09

In other news, your dishwasher may have a web server in it.
Maybe Kelly Conway wasn't so far wrong after all? (Nah, she probably still was).

Can't wait to see what some script kiddie decides to tell our kitchen appliances to do.

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/03/26/miele_joins_internetofst_hall_of_shame/

HTTPS Everywhere: Deep Dive Into Making the Switch

Submitted by Sam Moore on Mon, 03/06/2017 - 21:00

HTTPS image

Not only are some browsers now throwing flares when forms are presented without encryption, but Google is starting to notice as well.
Bottom line - it's time to get a cert and make your site work over encrypted connections.

Here's a detailed article that will take you through the steps required to get HTTPS working on your site(s).

https://www.lullabot.com/articles/https-everywhere-deep-dive-into-making-the-switch

 

Industry-specific pages debut on Drupal.org

Submitted by Sam Moore on Mon, 03/06/2017 - 15:59

Did you know 73% of the top 30 media companies use Drupal? Neither did I.

Drupal.org has 3 new industry-specific pages, offering case studies and talking points, like the one above, for prospective site builders who are considering Drupal.

The three market verticals are Higher Ed, Media/Publishing, and Government.

Having worked in all 3, I can attest there's lots of opportunity there. Hopefully these new pages will help get the word out.

 

https://www.drupal.org/association/blog/drupalorg-industry-pages-are-live

Signal v. Noise: Persistence is undervalued

Submitted by Sam Moore on Mon, 01/23/2017 - 21:11

People undervalue persistence. You’ve been told since you were a kid stories of trains getting up mountains with the power of persistence. Get up. Try again. And again. It feels like the most cliche advice there ever was: I think I can.

But still, we underestimate how beneficial that extra effort becomes.

https://m.signalvnoise.com/persistence-is-undervalued-d1f5a5a5fda2#.qzc8k0hyg

Hacker News: Thousands of websites still vulnerable to Heartbleed

Submitted by Sam Moore on Mon, 01/23/2017 - 12:03

Hacker news logo

It takes roughly three steps to remediate the Heartbleed bug.
 

  1. Patching: Update your software to the latest versions of OpenSSL; thankfully almost all organization have accomplished this step.
  2. Creation of New Private Keys: Creating new private keys will prevent an attacker, who already exploited the flaw before patching, from being able to spy on your encrypted.
  3. Reissuance of Security Certificates: This step will eliminate the ability of any attacker to spoof organizations and fool or phish their customers.

http://thehackernews.com/2017/01/heartbleed-openssl-vulnerability.html